Oktoberfest in Cordoba

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Enjoying our Beers at Oktoberfest

Before moving to Argentina I didn’t realize how strong the German influence could be in certain areas. Now that I live here, I have learned that certain towns actually appear more German than Argentine and there is a very unique mix of cultures. This was very obvious in the town of Villa General Belgrano in the Cordoba Providence. This town is famous for its Oktoberfest celebration (which occurs the for 10 days in the first of October) so naturally I wanted to check it out. It is known as one of the largest Oktoberfest celebrations outside of Germany and I can see why. I was lucky enough to meet a friend in Mendoza that offered to drive me and my friends to Cordoba capital for free. We left on Friday evening and decided to stay in Cordoba capital Friday night. We stayed at Morada Hostel which was fine but definitely not worth the $280 pesos per person. However, it did include breakfast at the restaurant next door and their coffee was really good.
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Enjoying our First Pint
Travel Tip: We booked everything a little last minute so our options were limited. I would recommend trying to book a little further in advance to find cheaper options and options closer to the festival but you can definitely book last minute and still find accommodations.
On Saturday, we took a bus from Cordoba to Villa General Belgrano. It was very easy to catch the bus because LEP bus company have multiple buses every 30 minutes. Our ticket was $138 pesos each way. Upon arriving to General Belgrano we went to our campsite which was 7km away from the center of the city. While 7km is not far it was a long walk and definitely proved to be a little difficult without a car. The name of the camping was Veilchental. It cost $400 pesos per night (definitely overpriced for camping) but it did include 24 hr hot showers. Saturday afternoon, we went to the festival. We decided to give hitch hiking a try and had some luck after only a few minutes. We then decided to explore the main street named Julio Argentino Roca and we stopped at Blumen Haus for our first beer along with some traditional German food of multiple types of sausages, sauerkraut, and boiled potatoes. We then decided to walk around the town and take in the sites, people, and activities.
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Loved this Local Mural
Travel Tip: While there is an actual festival it cost $250-$500 pesos depending on the day. My friends and I opted to save that money to spend on beer and just party in the streets because it was very similar to the paid festival. There were a ton of people with portable speakers playing music, tons of craft beer, and dancing.
Saturday night we hung out in the street meeting people and drinking cervezas before heading out for some dancing around 1am. On Sunday, we got a cafe and medialuna at Delicias and then walked around town and did some window shopping and exploring. We went to lunch at Restaurant Frankfurt which has AMAZING food. In the afternoon, we decided to walk down to the festival to make sure we weren’t missing anything. We decided to sit and enjoy the beautiful day and listen to the music which you could easily hear from outside. That evening we went to ice cream at Heladeria Suiza which was very good. (I definitely approve of the Argentina’s love for ice cream.) Sunday night we met up with some friends from Saturday night and just enjoyed the evening. On Monday, we headed back to Cordoba capital to meet up with my friend.
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Main Plaza in Villa General Belgrano
Overall, I thought that Oktoberfest was really fun and I definitely recommend it to anyone visiting Argentina during October. However, if you are on a backpackers budget like me, you can definitely have fun drinking and socializing in the street and you don’t need to pay for the actual festival!
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Author: jordansjourneys2

Hi! My name is Jordan Gurkin and I am currently living in Argentina. I'm a travel blogger focused on bringing you budget travel advice, travel tips, and some of my recommendations on places to visit!

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